Why Clean Your Beer Lines?

BETTER TASTE

WHY CLEAN YOUR BEVERAGE LINES?

A great tasting beverage is a work of art. A brewer puts a lot of time and effort to make sure that the keg of beer you receive in your bar tastes exactly the way it’s supposed to. It’s our job to keep those flavors blending properly when you pour a customer a draught. You need to keep your beverage lines clean is of the utmost importance. In order to help preserve both your customer base and your relationship with your brewery, here’s what you should look out for.

MUST KNOWS

BREWERY POLICIES ON LINE CLEANING

    

Most breweries understand the correlation between a clean draught system and the quality of the beverage served to your customers. Proper line cleaning can impact not only their product itself, but also their reputation and sales. Most include beverage line procedures and schedules within their quality assurance polices, and are monitored and enforced by contract distributors, depending on state statues.

There is a consensus among the breweries that draught systems should be cleaned a minimum of every 2 weeks. Long draw beer systems longer than 25 feet or establishments that serve large amounts of beer every week should be cleaned more frequently, once a week is recommended

WHAT MAKES US EXPERTS

BEST RESULTS

Cleaning Lines to Perfection

Two hours of pump cleaning services.

Consistency

Every 2 weeks, we service your lines.

Crystal Clean

Cleaning all of the faucets with 3 individual sized brushes to a beautiful shine.

IMPORTANT INFO

BEER FLAVOR CAN BE AFFECTED BY:

Bacteria found in beer isn’t necessarily hazardous, but it does affect the appearance, aroma and taste of the beer. The presence of bacteria can mean an “off taste’ and cloudy appearance that makes the beer unappetizing. If you notice a sour taste or a vinegar or rotten eggs smell to your beer, it may be a sign ob bacteria in your draught system.

 

Beer Stone is a combination of calcium and oxalic acids or salts left behind by the beer as it’s being poured. These deposits can build up over time, and eventually will flake off and mix with the beer as it comes through the draught system, which can affect the taste of your beer.

 

Mold is introduced to your draught system through exposure to the air and can be found as surface growth on components that are exposed to air like the faucets, keg couplers and drains. Mold is usually brown or black in color.

Yeast is part of the brewing process, as well as in the air around us. both can have a negative effect on your draught system, and can be found as surface growth on areas that are exposed to air, like mold. Yeast is usually white or gray in color.

Before vs After

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